‘Motown Chartbusters Vol. 3’

A life in music No. 14 – 1981

Motown Chartbusters Vol.3

On Valentine’s Day in 1970 this album was the first ever compilation to reach No.1 in the UK album chart. Eleven years later it was my vinyl introduction to the Detroit hit factory, Motown. From my ever-decreasing memory I vaguely remember purchasing it for two reasons – firstly the track listing (bearing in mind my junior knowledge of Motown) looked fantastic, and secondly the sleeve, in all its shining glory looked even better. Yes, I was an early sucker for an eye-catching cover.

Having subsequently purchased all twelve volumes I believe I managed to choose the best first. Having visited the original Motown recording studio in Detroit some ten years later it would be accurate to say black American music from around ’62-’72 became a fixation throughout my late teens and twenties. Much of what I was enjoying from UK bands at the time was influenced by many of the artists on this album, but more importantly it was the names behind the artists who created the inspirational sound and production that was so unique and uplifting. I didn’t yet know these names (most notably the songwriting genius of Holland-Dozier-Holland and producer Norman Whitfield), but I knew how this music affected me. Motown made me smile and it made me want to dance.

Motown_Chartbusters_Volume_3

Featuring tracks from the mid to late 60s I had my favourites. The cool and passionate calling of Marvin Gaye’s ‘I Heard It Through The Grapevine’ and Smokey Robinson’s timeless tear-jerker ‘The Tracks Of My Tears’. The relentlessly joyous Stevie Wonder and my album favourite ‘(I’m A) Road Runner’ by Jr. Walker & The All Stars were and still all remain musical gems; masterpieces of songwriting and production. Berry Gordy’s Motown record label is possibly the most notorious success story in the history of the popular music industry. Why? Because of where the music came from, its sheer belligerent sparkle and ultimately how far it reached.

Smokey Robinson summed it up perfectly – “Into the ’60s, I was still not of a frame of mind that we were not only making music, we were making history. But I did recognize the impact because acts were going all over the world at that time. I recognized the bridges that we crossed, the racial problems and the barriers that we broke down with music. I recognized that because I lived it. I would come to the South in the early days of Motown and the audiences would be segregated. Then they started to get the Motown music and we would go back and the audiences were integrated and the kids were dancing together and holding hands.”

1972: Theme To Robinson Crusoe
1973: Sweet – ‘Blockbuster’
1977: E.L.O – ‘Out Of The Blue’
1978: Blondie – ‘Picture This’
1979: Squeeze – ‘Cool For Cats’
1979: Madness – ‘One Step Beyond’
1979: The Specials – ‘The Specials’
1980: The Beat – ‘I Just Can’t Stop It’
1980: The Jam – ‘Going Underground’
1980: Dexys Midnight Runners – ‘Searching For The Young Soul Rebels’
1980: The Beatles – ’1967-1970′ (Blue album)
1980: This Is Soul
1981: The Kinks – ‘Golden Hour Of The Kinks’
1981: Motown Chartbusters Volume 3

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